Orphan Kittens: How You Can Help

Orphan Kittens: How You Can Help

Kitten season typically runs from March to November. If you’ve found an orphan kitten, prompt action is required to save its life. However, please take a moment to decide if the kitten or litter you’ve located has truly been orphaned. Separating very young kittens from an attentive mother will often make things worse instead of better! WHERE’S MOM? The mother cat typically remains continuously with newborn kittens for the first few days after giving birth, but she may leave for short periods to hunt for food. Also, a mother cat will often pick up and move her litter to a new location as establishing a new nest is part of the cat’s instinctual behavior to safeguard her young by not remaining in one place too long. WHAT TO DO? If you find small kittens without a mother cat, don’t assume they have been abandoned as the mother may be away hunting for food or may be moving the kittens, one-by-one, to or from the place you found them. If the kittens are safe for the time being, you should observe them quietly from a safe distance to see if the mother returns. It is always best to keep a mother together with her kittens whenever possible for the best chance of survival as hand-raising a young, “pre-weaned” kitten is an intensive round-the-clock job. In a home situation, kittens should be kept with their mother until they are 8 weeks of age. However, kittens born to feral mothers should be separated from her at about 4 weeks. At this age, it is easy to socialize them and they have gotten...
Club Feral Cleanup Days – Help us say Goodbye to Club Feral!

Club Feral Cleanup Days – Help us say Goodbye to Club Feral!

It is with mixed emotions that we get ready to shut down our outdoor location in Morgan Hill, affectionately known as “Club Feral”. Town Cats has used this location for many years to house feral cats who were awaiting placement or otherwise needed help. Going forward, while we will absolutely continue our commitment to feral and “community” cats through a variety of programs, we will not be housing them at this location. There were too many problems with flooding this winter that make the location unsafe for us to use. We have taken care of over a hundred cats at this location, and just during 2016 44 cats were placed in homes through the Working Cat program, most of them from Club Feral. The Working Cat program is one of the programs we will be continuing. Of the 7 cats who were still living at Club Feral in January when it flooded, 1 of them has been adopted (Kyra) 2 are doing very well at socializing (Carlos and Sammy) and we hope that they can be adopted in the future to a regular home, and the other 4 continue to do well in their enclosure and we are working hard to find placements for them (Nadius, Simba, Manxy and Ginger). All of these remaining cats are either senior cats or have medical conditions that makes it much more difficult to place them in “Working Cat” situations, which is why they are still with us. But we remain optimistic that we will find the “Right place” for each of them to call their own. In order to prepare to turn...
Feline Infectious Diseases Training Workshop – March 17

Feline Infectious Diseases Training Workshop – March 17

Want to learn how you can help prevent the spread of infectious diseases and keep our cats healthy while they wait for their forever homes? Please join us for a fun and informative training with our very own Dr. Bing! She will teach you everything you need to know about common cat diseases seen in foster cats; the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatments given! All active volunteers are encouraged to attend. Friday, March 17th at 7:00pm at the Vineland Library Community Room 1450 Blossom Hill Road in San Jose. Please email us at laurie.melo@towncats.org for more information or to sign...
Foster Volunteer Orientation – March 16

Foster Volunteer Orientation – March 16

If you have a spare room, a flexible schedule and a warm heart, please consider becoming a foster parent for Town Cats of Morgan Hill! In exchange for free room and board, we can promise you lots of hugs and purrs! Foster parents care for young kittens and cats that aren’t quite ready for adoption. The foster parents provide the personal care while Town Cats provides the medical care and guidance. In return for your care, you get training and support! And, of course, lots of love and gratitude too! You may wonder why an animal needs foster care. It’s simple. Like people who lose their homes, animals need time and a warm, safe place to get their bearings and to get ready for the next step. Ready to be a hero? Not sure? Afraid you’ll fall in love and won’t be able to let go? Talk to us. We’re foster parents too. Come join us! Our next Orientation will be held: Thursday, March 16th at 6:30-7:00pm at the Vineland Library 1450 Blossom Hill Road in San Jose Please email us at laurie.melo@towncats.org to sign up! Immediately after the orientation, we will hold a more detailed training session on how to care for orphaned kittens. You are welcome to stay for that session which will run from...
Feral Freedom Drivers Wanted!

Feral Freedom Drivers Wanted!

Town Cats is in need of Feral Freedom Drivers!  Will you chauffeur a feral cat on a one-way, road trip back home? Because they certainly can’t drive themselves home! As a member of the Santa Clara County WECARE Coalition, a partnership between local city shelters, Town Cats provides transportation volunteers for the spay, neuter and return Feral Freedom Program operating out of the The San Jose Animal Care Center on Monterey Road.  Community cats are driven back to their original location after they have been spayed/neutered at the shelter.   They are also microchipped and vaccinated.  The volunteer shifts run about 2-3 hours at a time and volunteer hours are flexible afternoons Tuesday to Saturday. Training and mentoring are provided. Requirements: Reliable car, cell phone, GPS, and team spirit. Must be 18+ and interested in a long term commitment. Volunteer at least 4 hours a month. (evenings mostly) Responsibilities: Volunteer reports for duty, picks up several cats in their crates with a list of addresses where each cat is to be released. Once at the location, the crate is opened in a safe area away from the street to deter the cat from running in the street and into potential danger. Return empty crates to the shelter in the designated return location with the required paperwork. DONE! Feral Freedom – Town Cats Drivers TOWN CATS NEEDS FERAL FREEDOM DRIVERS!Will you chauffeur feral cat on a one-way, road trip back home ?The San Jose animal shelter has a program to spay/neuter healthy community cats but the cats need a ride back to their colony. Are you available to transport them home back to their neighborhood? They...
Wanted: Cat Whisperers to Help Community Cats

Wanted: Cat Whisperers to Help Community Cats

Once in a while, we come across a kitten or cat that is either born in an outdoor colony or through back luck and unfortunate experiences is just not socialized and therefore hard to adopt out. However, just because a kitten was born outdoors, or a cat has been living in a colony does not mean they are destined to live their lives as community cats. Here at Town Cats, we often pull cats and kittens from the city shelter. Kittens under 3 months tend to be fairly easy to socialize. Older cats display interest in people but are shy or nervous.  Often, they appear feral, but generally we find out that they just need a little love, a little patience and some time to adjust to their new surroundings indoors. Tips for getting started with socializing feral cats and kittens: Remember that cats and kittens are very sensitive to their surroundings and contrary to popular belief, they don’t adjust well to sudden changes.  So take it slow, minimal sudden movements, speak softly and give them time. Hissing and spitting is a natural defense mechanism for all cats; it really just says, “I’m really scared and I’m trying to make myself scary so you will go away!” It is normal for cats and kittens to hiss when they go from a familiar colony outdoors into a busy, noisy city shelter that is boiling with the scent of hundreds of other animals. It is quite unnerving to say the least. It is best to put a scared cat or kitten in a cat condo or in a small room like a bathroom, let them get used to their new...