Statistics

Maddie’s Fund™ is a family foundation created in 1994 by Workday Co-Founder Dave Duffield and his wife, Cheryl, to help create a no-kill nation. Dave and Cheryl endowed the Foundation with more than $300 million. Since then the Foundation has awarded more than $187 million in grants. Maddie’s Fund™ mission is to revolutionize the status and well-being of companion animals. You can read about the work that Maddie’s Fund™ does on its website here.  

Thanks to Maddie’s  Fund™ for their support and championing of animal welfare organizations, and for driving all organizations to be more transparent in reporting our statistics. As a proud recipient of grant support from Maddie’s  Fund™  and a participant in the Million Cat Challenge and Shelter Animals Count, we are happy to share our statistics, which tell us where we have been, where we currently are, and where we want to go.

2016 Year in Review

Mission:
We work to alleviate the suffering of stray, abandoned, unwanted, and feral cats in Santa Clara County.

Lifesaving:
2421 cats came into our care during 2016
576 cats went to loving homes
1908 feral cats were released after being spayed/neutered
Live Release Rate *  99.24%

*“Live Release Rate” is the number of live outcomes divided by the number of total outcomes. Town Cats is a no-kill organization and we give every cat in our care the time and support they need to find a loving home. However, because we take in some very vulnerable and sick cats and kittens—including newborn orphaned kittens—some of the cats in our care do pass away or are humanely euthanized to end suffering due to incurable disease. Our live release rate is the number of cats who were adopted, released to their feral colonies after being spayed/neutered or otherwise transferred out alive, divided by the total number of cats adopted/transferred plus any cats who died or were euthanized in our care.

Shelter Statistics – Asilomar Accords

The Asilomar Accords outline principles that guide animal welfare organizations to work together to save the lives of all healthy and treatable companion animals. The document aims to cut through the rhetoric of “no kill” vs. “limited admission” vs. “open admission” shelters and to dispel the murkiness of what defines an adoptable animal. The animal sheltering world hasn’t always been clear or consistent when it comes to reporting results. Without the Asilomar Accords, definitions and reporting methods varied from group to group, making understanding of information difficult, if not impossible, across organizations.

By utilizing a standard language for their statistics, shelters and their supporters are able to easily and clearly track progress both at a specific shelter and across shelters nationwide.

For more information on the Asilomar Accords, please see www.asilomaraccords.org/definitions.html

The following information covers all 6 shelters in Santa Clara County for easy reference, please see the separate tab in each document for Town Cats specific data.

2016 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 

2015 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 

2014 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 

2013 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 

2012 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 

2011 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics  

2010 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 
 

2009 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics 
  

2008 Asilomar Accords Shelter Statistics